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What Raises Your Risk for Cataracts?

Cataracts occur when the eye’s lens begins to lose its clarity. This stems from the clustering of proteins, which make up the lens. When these proteins are no longer spread evenly across the lens, their groupings can cause lens clouding. As a result, light cannot pass through the lens as easily, which results in deteriorated vision. It’s essential that you maintain consistent appointments with your ophthalmologist to help promote the early detection and treatment of cataracts, as individuals of all ages may potentially develop them. However, the following factors can increase a person’s risk for this eyesight disorder:

Cataract

Age

Older individuals have an increased risk of developing cataracts. In fact, cataracts are most often diagnosed among seniors. This may be attributed to decades of normal ocular wear and tear that eventually prompts the proteins in the lens to move around and cluster together.

Sun Exposure

Extensive exposure to UV rays can heighten a person’s risk for cataracts. The reasons for this have yet to be fully explained. If you spend time outside on a regular basis, be sure to invest in a pair of sunglasses that provide protection against UV rays.

Injury

Suffering a significant eye injury may prompt the development of a cataract. However, if a cataract develops as the result of an injury, it might not be apparent for a significant period of time after the injury.

Lifestyle Choices

Engaging in cigarette smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, or steroid use can be detrimental to your health for many reasons. These types of damaging lifestyle habits can lead to the formation of cataracts. To help maintain both your eyesight and your overall wellbeing, refrain from participation in these activities.

Do you suspect that you might have cataracts? If so, make an appointment with NYC ophthalmologist Dr. Mark Hornfeld today. Our ophthalmology facility has effectively treated countless patients suffering from cataracts, and we can help you, too. Call us today at (212) 580-8881 for more information.